Saturday, March 26, 2016

Support the National Right To Work Act

From the National Right To Work Committee:

I'll get right to it.

The deadline to collect petitions urging the Senate to hold a vote on the National Right to Work Act is just 48 hours away.

And with the November elections fast approaching, nothing strikes fear into the hearts of union bosses more than losing their grip on the ten billion dollar a year warchest stuffed with forced-union dues.

This stockpile of cash has funded Big Government politicians for decades.

Jimmy Carter.

Bill Clinton.

Barack Obama.

The mess created by Big Labor's handpicked politicians sticks with us today.

And the first step of the cleanup is putting members of Congress on the record.

Will they stand with the overwhelming majority of Americans who believe in worker freedom?

Or will they side with Big Labor and their disastrous agenda which holds down wages, wrecks our economy and installs puppet politicians in office?

So I'm counting on your immediate action to swamp Congress with a wave of grassroots activism.

Please sign your petition before time runs out.

The deadline is just 48 hours away and it's vital I count on every Right to Work supporter to make their voice heard.

After you complete your petition, please chip in a contribution to help your National Right to Work Committee contact two million Americans by email, social media, direct mail and phone calls to turn up the heat on Congress to hold a vote on the National Right to Work Act.

Time is running out, so please act right away.

Sincerely,

Mark Mix

P.S. Your Committee's program to secure public, roll-call votes on the National Right to Work Act is underway.

I'm counting on you to help your National Right to Work Committee reach our goal of 50,000 petitions before the March 28th deadline by completing yours today.

After you complete your petition, please chip in a contribution of $10 or $25 to help your National Right to Work Committee keep the pressure on Congress to hold a vote on this crucial legislation.

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