Sunday, October 25, 2015

Comcast attacks Net Neutrality

From Demand Progress:

A few weeks ago, we started noticing something strange.

All around the country, opinion columns written by so-called experts started appearing in major newspapers—all attacking Net Neutrality.1

They repeated the same phony arguments that Comcast makes: They say Net Neutrality isn't legal. They say it's antiquated and out of date. They say it'll hurt the economy.

But then it became clear: This was no coincidence. This is a coordinated public relations backlash funded and organized by the telecommunications lobby.

We can’t let these dishonest claims stand. Will you chip in to help counter these attacks on Net Neutrality in the media?

Yes, I'll chip in to help defend Net Neutrality.

The FCC's historic rule made Net Neutrality the law of the land. It took years of organizing and millions of people speaking out, but we won.

But Comcast is still fighting to stop Net Neutrality—because they know this fight is far from over.

First, the telecommunications industry hit the FCC with an avalanche of lawsuits to overturn Net Neutrality.2 Then they asked their friends in Congress to use must-pass legislation to fund the federal government to gut Net Neutrality.3 And finally, they started lining up presidential candidates like Jeb Bush to pledge to overturn Net Neutrality if elected.4

If we want to stop Comcast from destroying the free and open Internet by creating an Internet slow lane, we need to fight back with real grassroots voices speaking out in favor of Net Neutrality. Will you chip in?

Yes, I'll chip in to help defend Net Neutrality.

Thanks for standing with us.

David, Daniel, Kurt, Mark, Sara, Victoria and the rest of the Demand Progress team

Sources:

1. Big Phone and Cable’s Summer Hack-a-thon,Freepress, September 3, 2015

2. FCC net neutrality rules hit with new telecom lawsuits,Politico, April 14, 2015

3. Funding bill would block net neutrality until courts rule,The Hill, June 10, 2015

4. Jeb Bush says he’d repeal net neutrality, The Washington Post, September 22, 2015

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